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Guideline Publications 129 - Mikoyan-Gurevich  MiG-3
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129 - Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-3
  £17.00

Author Nikolay Yakubovich

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Warpaint No.129 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-3 Author Nikolay Yakubovich
72 pages. £17.00
9 pages of Colour Profiles
6 pages of Scale Plans
Over 120 images some never published before!!!

By the time Operation Barbarossa unfolded on 22 June 1941 some 981 MiG-3s were in service with the Soviet Air Forces (VVS), the Soviet Air Defence Forces (PVO) and Soviet Naval Aviation, but the aircraft had undergone a difficult development and was an unforgiving machine to fly in combat. It had been designed for high-altitude but combat over the Eastern Front was gen-erally at lower altitudes, where it was outmatched by its chief adversary, the Bf 109. Combat losses were high, and over time, the aircraft were concen-trated in the PVO, where its disadvantages mattered less, despite which the type had been replaced in service by the end of the conflict. This latest book in the Warpaint series covers the aircraft comprehensively, with an impres-sive historical text, and a selection of photographs that will be essential for any modeller considering a project. Drawing on original Soviet sources and archives this is an authoritative and comprehensive account of one of the great fighter aircraft of World War 2. Once again author Nikolay Yakubovich has provided an authoritative text backed up by historical images and colour artwork and scale drawings to the same standard by artist Andrey Yurgen-son.
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Guideline Publications 128 Bristol Scout
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128 Bristol Scout
  £14.00

Author Matthew Willis

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One of the great unsung keystones in the development of aerial combat, the Bristol Scout was originally designed as a racing aircraft. It was used by the RNAS and the RFC as a 'scout', or fast reconnaissance machine, and was one of the first single-seaters to be used as a fighter aircraft. Designed in the second half of 1913 the first flight was made at Larkhill on 23 February the following year after which it was exhibited at the March 1914 Aero Show at Olympia in London. It was evaluated by the British military in May 1914 at Farnborough and its period of service saw great leaps forward in the design and tactical usage of fighter aircraft, and many of the earliest attempts to perfect forward-firing guns were tested in action using Bristol Scouts. An RNAS Scout was the first landplane to be flown from a ship, when Flt.Cdr. B.F Fowler flew No. 1255 from the flying deck of the seaplane carrier HMS Vindex on 3 November 1915. The aircraft saw service in both Europe and the Middle East but by mid-1916 was largely relegated to training units. This latest book in the Warpaint series covers the aircraft comprehensively, with an
impressive historical text, and a selection of photographs that will be essential for any modeller considering a project.
Author Matthew Willis is well-known for his authoritative books on classic British aircraft, and we are particularly pleased to add this follow-up to his earlier volume on the Sopwith Pup to the series. Artwork is by John Fox
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Guideline Publications Cesna T-37 & A-37 Dragonfly ON SALE NOW
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Cesna T-37 & A-37 Dragonfly
  £20.00
ON SALE NOW
Author Kev Darling

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When USAF went searching for a new jet trainer in the early 1950's to replace the Lockheed T-33, it came as a great surprise to all when Cessna, best known for producing light aircraft, actually won the competition. Little did anyone realise that the T-37, the new training aircraft's designation, would stay in service for fifty years. Along the way the fleet had many rebuilds and is reckoned to have conservatively trained over 500,000 pilots to wings standard. Along the way it garnered many nicknames including 'Tweet, Tweety Bird' and the 'Screaming Dog Whistle'. Had the conflict in Vietnam been avoided this might of been the end of the line for the multi coloured trainer. As America became more involved with the conflict in South East Asia USAF was on a buying spree for all of the latest all singing, all dancing fighter attack aircraft. However, despite their supersonic capability and state of the art avionics these mighty behemoths were not suited to the close air support role. The answer would be to recall some stored early T-37's from the boneyard at Davis-Monthan and in consultation with Cessna turn the 'Tweet' into an attack aircraft. Few high tech gizmo's were needed although the new fighter would sport a minigun in the nose. Pylons were added under the strengthened wings, tip tanks, from the T-37C, were added and engines with a bit more grunt were fitted. The designated unit destined to fly the A-37A 'Dragonfly ' was the 8th Special Operations Squadron. Such was their dedication that a shack on the bombing range was used a measuring point for bombing accuracy. They knew they had succeeded when one pilot blew up the Shack exclaiming the 'SHACK' call over the radio very loudly. The A-37A was soon followed by the 'B' model that was vastly improved and went onto serve globally for many years especially in Latin American countries where a few linger on. This book is written by Kev Darling and is supported with artwork by John Fox.
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Guideline Publications 126 Grumman F-14 Tomcat OUT NOW
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126 Grumman F-14 Tomcat
  £25.00
OUT NOW
Author Charles Stafrace

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Grumman F-14 Tomcat by Charles Stafrace


The US Navy embarked on the VFX fighter programme when it became obvious that the weight, engine and manoeuvrability issues plaguing F-111B, the naval variant of the Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX), would not be resolved to the Navy's satisfaction. The Navy requirement was for a fleet air defence fighter whose primary role was intercepting Soviet bombers before they could launch missiles against the carrier battle group. The Navy strenuously opposed the TFX, which incorporated the US Air Force's requirements for a low-level attack aircraft that were not required by the Navy.
Grumman came up with a solution in the form of their F-14 Tomcat, a supersonic, twin-engine, two-seat, variable-sweep wing aircraft. But what made the Tomcat head and shoulders above all other fighters was its AWG-9 weapons control radar married to the superlative AIM-54A Phoenix air-to-air missile. The Tomcat was all the US Navy required, and the F-111B episode was soon forgotten. The F-14A was the first version of the Tomcat, and it entered US Navy service in 1972 with VF-1 and VF-2 and first deployed overseas on USS Enterprise in 1974, gradually replacing the later versions of the F-4 Phantom on the US carriers' decks.
The F-14A served only with one foreign air force, the Imperial Iranian Air Force which, after the 1978 revolution, came to be known as the Iranian Islamic Iranian Air Force. The Tomcat's role in Iran's war against Iraq from 1980 to 1988 is explained in detail. The Iranian, in its locally-improvised versions, is still in service.
The F-14A version of the Tomcat inherited not only the AWG-9/AIM-54 system from the ill-fated F-111B but also its troublesome TF30 engine. In the US Navy it was only when the F-14B was re-engined with the more powerful and more reliable F-110-GE-400, as was also the F-14D, that the Tomcat really showed its true potential in the air.
The Tomcat went on to serve on all US carriers of the Forrestal and Kitty Hawk Class of carriers and on all nuclear powered carriers built until 2006, the year when the Tomcat was retired from service. During the years it spent on deck, the Tomcat, in its F-14A, F-14B and F-14D versions, participated in all US interventions of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s in the Mediterranean, Middle East and Horn of Africa, and distinguished itself not only as an interceptor fighter, but later also as a ground support and reconnaissance aircraft when the need for these two new roles were needed and when equipped with the LANTIRN and TARPS systems. The Tomcat's story was immortalised by the Hollywood production that made 'Tomcat' and 'Top Gun' household names, but in real life the Tomcat was truly a confirmed 'MiG-killer' and a 'Sukhoi-killer' in encounters with hostile Libyan opposition.
Its exit from the US Navy scene in 2006 was a controversial one, as the aircraft was still considered a valuable asset to the fleet. However, its astronomical maintenance hours per flight hours and its ageing systems compared with the newer F/A-18 Hornet worked against it.
All this is explained in detail in this new Warpaint title, a 124-page account of America's most famous fighter of recent times, that contains no fewer than 280 photos, ten pages of colour profiles, scale plans, fourteen information tables and a text that give exact details of every squadrons, details of all deployments with carrier, CVW, dates and destination, conversions to later versions, and many other information as now expected from titles by author Charles Stafrace, supported by superb artwork by John Fox.
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Stock code: WPT125

 

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Guideline Publications 125 Bristol Britannia Canadair CP-107 Argus & CC-106 Yukon
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125 Bristol Britannia
  £16.00
Canadair CP-107 Argus & CC-106 Yukon
Author Charles Stafrace

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Bristol Britannia,
Canadair CP-107 Argus & CC-106 Yukon
By Charles Stafrace

The Bristol Britannia, known as the Whispering Giant because of its silent engines, was the world's first long-range turboprop-powered aircraft. It was built for the Royal Air Force as well as for civil airlines, and in time became renowned for its reliability. However, its gestation period was not easy, and its saga was one of sadness and disappointment, so that it entered service a decade after the first specification had been issued. Its period of service with BOAC and the major airlines was not long, as by then these had opted for the more glamorous jet-powered airliners. As a result, only 85 Britannias were produced by Bristol at Filton and at a second production line at Short Bros & Harland in Belfast, of which 23 went to the RAF. But thereafter the Britannia served at length with other less well known British and overseas airlines and feeder companies. It continued to fly as the RAF's main trooper as late as 1976, until its long-range role became redundant with the closing down of British Far East and Middle East bases. Early in the Britannia's development, the Royal Canadian Air Force was in search of a maritime patrol aircraft to replace the ageing Lancaster, and Canadair obtained a licence from Bristol to build the CP-107 Argus, which was basically a Britannia with a completely new fuselage to cater for the different role. Also an anti-submarine aircraft, the Argus inherited the Britannia's long range, loiter time and reliability so necessary for operating over the sea for long hours. In its early days, the Argus was the most advanced anti-submarine/patrol aircraft in the world. The Britannia's long-range characteristics attracted Canadair to start constructing the airliner under licence in Canada as the CL-44. The first examples went to the Royal Canadian Air Force as the CC-106 Yukon, which had a longer fuselage than the Britannia. For commercial use, Canadair introduced the CL-44D-4 version, which had the added feature of a folding rear fuselage to enable it to be used as a bulk carrier. The Britannia and its Canadian derivatives were not built in huge numbers - 39 Yukons and CL-44s, and 33 Argus were built in Canada. These and the 85 Britannias carried out useful work faithfully and reliably, and all over the world, the last civilian Britannia being retired in 1997. All versions of this interesting aircraft are described in this new Warpaint title written by Charles Stafrace, and illustrated by 115 photos, many of them in colour, in addition to plans and seven pages of artwork by John Fox.
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Stock code: WPT125

 

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Guideline Publications 124 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17 Warpaint 124
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124 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17
  £16.00
Warpaint 124
Author Nikolay Yakubovich

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Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17 Author Nikolay Yakubovich

The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17 Fresco followed on from the successful MiG-15 design providing the Soviet air forces with a high-subsonic fighter aircraft that was able to hold
its own against many of the NATO aircraft of its day. MiG-17s first saw combat in 1958
in the Second Taiwan Strait Crisis and later proved to be an effective threat against more modern supersonic fighters of the United States in the Vietnam War. Produced in the USSR from 1952 and operated by numerous air forces in many variants, the aircraft was license- built in China as the Shenyang J-5 and Poland as the PZL-Mielec Lim-6. This latest addition to the Warpaint series follows on from the acclaimed title on the MiG-15 and draws on original Soviet documentation to provide a very thorough technical and historical account of the aircraft's development and service. Once again author Nikolay Yakubovich has provided an authoritative text backed up by historical images and colour artwork and scale drawings to the same standard by artist Andrey Yurgenson.
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Stock code: WPT124

 

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Guideline Publications 123 DHC-1 Chipmunk Warpaint 123
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123 DHC-1 Chipmunk
  £14.00
Warpaint 123
Author Adrian M Balch

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de Havilland (Canada) DHC-1 CHIPMUNK - by Adrian M Balch

The Chipmunk is probably the most famous and well-known post-war piston-engined basic training aircraft after the Tiger Moth, for which it was designed as a replacement by de Havilland in Canada. It first flew on 22 May 1946 and entered operational service that same year. During the late 1940s and 1950s, the Chipmunk was procured in large numbers for air arms around the world, primarily the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and the, Royal Air Force (RAF), who utilised it as their standard primary trainer aircraft. The type was also produced under licence by de Havilland in the United Kingdom, who would build the vast majority of Chipmunks, as well as by OGMA (Oficinas Gerais de Material Aeronáutico) in Portugal.The type served with the RAF right up until 1996 in the ab initial training role and many still fly today in civilian guise. This is another quality publication in the Warpaint series by author Adrian Balch, who relates the history of the Chipmunk together with colour scheme details for the modeller, supported by no less than 90 top quality photographs from his archives, the majority of which are in colour. Many colourful profiles are provided by Jan Polc, making this 48-page publication a 'must have' for the aviation historian and modeller alike.
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Stock code: WPT123

 

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Guideline Publications 123 DHC-1 Chipmunk Warpaint 123
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123 DHC-1 Chipmunk
  £14.00
Warpaint 123
Author Adrian M Balch

This issue of Warpaint -120 MIG-15 is available as a Digital Edition
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de Havilland (Canada) DHC-1 CHIPMUNK - by Adrian M Balch

The Chipmunk is probably the most famous and well-known post-war piston-engined basic training aircraft after the Tiger Moth, for which it was designed as a replacement by de Havilland in Canada. It first flew on 22 May 1946 and entered operational service that same year. During the late 1940s and 1950s, the Chipmunk was procured in large numbers for air arms around the world, primarily the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and the, Royal Air Force (RAF), who utilised it as their standard primary trainer aircraft. The type was also produced under licence by de Havilland in the United Kingdom, who would build the vast majority of Chipmunks, as well as by OGMA (Oficinas Gerais de Material Aeronáutico) in Portugal.The type served with the RAF right up until 1996 in the ab initial training role and many still fly today in civilian guise. This is another quality publication in the Warpaint series by author Adrian Balch, who relates the history of the Chipmunk together with colour scheme details for the modeller, supported by no less than 90 top quality photographs from his archives, the majority of which are in colour. Many colourful profiles are provided by Jan Polc, making this 48-page publication a 'must have' for the aviation historian and modeller alike.
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Guideline Publications 122 Albatros D.1 - D.111 Warpaint 122
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122 Albatros D.1 - D.111
  £15.00
Warpaint 122
Author Dave Hooper

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Albatros D.I - D.III By Dave Hooper
The Albatros D.III was flown by many top German aces during World War One, including Wilhelm Frankl, Erich Löwenhardt, Manfred von Richthofen, Karl Emil Schäfer, Ernst Udet, and Kurt Wolff and was the preeminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as 'Bloody April' 1917. The D.III entered squadron service in December 1916, and was immediately acclaimed by German aircrews for its manoeuvrability and rate of climb. Albatros built approximately 500 D.III aircraft at its Johannisthal factory, but In the spring of 1917 D.III production shifted to Albatros' subsidiary, Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW), to permit Albatros to concentrate on development and production of the D.V. Between April and August 1917, Idflieg issued five separate orders for a total of 840 D.IIIs with the he OAW variant undergoing its proofing trials in June 1917. Production commenced at the Schneidemühl factory in June and continued through December 1917, with OAW aircraft distinguishable by their larger, rounded rudders. Peak service was in November 1917, with 446 aircraft available on the Western Front. This is the second Great War subject to be added to the Warpaint list and has been authored by Dave Hooper, founder of the IPMS Great War Special Interest Group and a long-standing contributor to aviation modelling journals, whose comprehensive knowledge and attention to detail will ensure this current title will maintain the high standards that have made Warpaint one of the most respected and sought after aviation reference sources. Includes a full walkaround of a replica D.III and scale plans and profiles by Jan Polc.
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Stock code: WPT122

 

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Guideline Publications 121 Douglas A-4 Skyhawk Warpaint 121
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121 Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
  £25.00
Warpaint 121
Author: Ian White AMRAeS

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Born out of a United States Navy (USN) requirement for a carrier-based, tactical, nuclear strike aircraft and designed under the supervision of the Douglas Aircraft Company's Edward H.Heinemann, the Skyhawk went on to become one of the USN and United States Marine Corps (USMC) iconic aircraft of the Vietnam War. Based around Heinemann's concept of 'keep it light, keep it simple' the Skyhawk evolved from a light-weight nuclear strike aircraft to an aircraft capable of hauling large amounts of ordnance by comparison to its size and with it a proven ability to accept damage and survive. It also served in the training, carrier qualification, 'buddy' tanker and target facilities roles. Originally designated A4D under the USN's designation system, but better know from 1961 as the A-4, the Skyhawk was built in large numbers at Douglas' and later McDonnell Douglas' factories at El Segundo and Long Beach. The prototype Skyhawk flew for the first time on 22nd June 1954 and entered USN service with Attack Squadron VA-72 at Quonset Point Naval Air Station in August 1956 and with the USMC the following month at Marine Corps Air Station, El Toro. Thereafter, the Skyhawk flew with in excess of fifty USN front line attack units and some fifteen units with the USMC, followed by a long career with the reserves and training squadrons, before it was retired from the USMC in June 1994 and the USN in September 1999. In addition to service with the USN and USMC, the Skyhawk served with the Argentinian Air Force and Navy, the Australian Navy, the Brazilian Navy, the Royal New Zealand Air Force, the Kuwait Air Force, the Iraqi Air Force, the Indonesian Air Force, the Israeli Air Force, the Republic of Singapore Air Force and the Malaysian Air Force. After retirement from military service Skyhawks operated under civilian registration in the US, Canada and Germany, where they are still flying, and with heritage organisations across North America. Overall, quite a record for an aircraft that never, thankfully, flew operationally in its intended role. This 144 page book is written by Ian White and is superbly illustrated by Richard J. Caruana.
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Stock code: WPT121

 

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