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Guideline Publications DHC-1 Chipmunk Warpaint 123
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DHC-1 Chipmunk
  £14.00
Warpaint 123
Author Adrian M Balch

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de Havilland (Canada) DHC-1 CHIPMUNK - by Adrian M Balch

The Chipmunk is probably the most famous and well-known post-war piston-engined basic training aircraft after the Tiger Moth, for which it was designed as a replacement by de Havilland in Canada. It first flew on 22 May 1946 and entered operational service that same year. During the late 1940s and 1950s, the Chipmunk was procured in large numbers for air arms around the world, primarily the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and the, Royal Air Force (RAF), who utilised it as their standard primary trainer aircraft. The type was also produced under licence by de Havilland in the United Kingdom, who would build the vast majority of Chipmunks, as well as by OGMA (Oficinas Gerais de Material Aeronáutico) in Portugal.The type served with the RAF right up until 1996 in the ab initial training role and many still fly today in civilian guise. This is another quality publication in the Warpaint series by author Adrian Balch, who relates the history of the Chipmunk together with colour scheme details for the modeller, supported by no less than 90 top quality photographs from his archives, the majority of which are in colour. Many colourful profiles are provided by Jan Polc, making this 48-page publication a 'must have' for the aviation historian and modeller alike.
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Stock code: WPT123

 

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Guideline Publications Albatros D.1 - D.111 Warpaint 122
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Albatros D.1 - D.111
  £15.00
Warpaint 122
Author Dave Hooper

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Albatros D.I - D.III By Dave Hooper
The Albatros D.III was flown by many top German aces during World War One, including Wilhelm Frankl, Erich Löwenhardt, Manfred von Richthofen, Karl Emil Schäfer, Ernst Udet, and Kurt Wolff and was the preeminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as 'Bloody April' 1917. The D.III entered squadron service in December 1916, and was immediately acclaimed by German aircrews for its manoeuvrability and rate of climb. Albatros built approximately 500 D.III aircraft at its Johannisthal factory, but In the spring of 1917 D.III production shifted to Albatros' subsidiary, Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW), to permit Albatros to concentrate on development and production of the D.V. Between April and August 1917, Idflieg issued five separate orders for a total of 840 D.IIIs with the he OAW variant undergoing its proofing trials in June 1917. Production commenced at the Schneidemühl factory in June and continued through December 1917, with OAW aircraft distinguishable by their larger, rounded rudders. Peak service was in November 1917, with 446 aircraft available on the Western Front. This is the second Great War subject to be added to the Warpaint list and has been authored by Dave Hooper, founder of the IPMS Great War Special Interest Group and a long-standing contributor to aviation modelling journals, whose comprehensive knowledge and attention to detail will ensure this current title will maintain the high standards that have made Warpaint one of the most respected and sought after aviation reference sources. Includes a full walkaround of a replica D.III and scale plans and profiles by Jan Polc.
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Stock code: WPT122

 

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Guideline Publications Douglas A-4 Skyhawk Warpaint 121
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Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
  £25.00
Warpaint 121
Author: Ian White AMRAeS

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Born out of a United States Navy (USN) requirement for a carrier-based, tactical, nuclear strike aircraft and designed under the supervision of the Douglas Aircraft Company's Edward H.Heinemann, the Skyhawk went on to become one of the USN and United States Marine Corps (USMC) iconic aircraft of the Vietnam War. Based around Heinemann's concept of 'keep it light, keep it simple' the Skyhawk evolved from a light-weight nuclear strike aircraft to an aircraft capable of hauling large amounts of ordnance by comparison to its size and with it a proven ability to accept damage and survive. It also served in the training, carrier qualification, 'buddy' tanker and target facilities roles. Originally designated A4D under the USN's designation system, but better know from 1961 as the A-4, the Skyhawk was built in large numbers at Douglas' and later McDonnell Douglas' factories at El Segundo and Long Beach. The prototype Skyhawk flew for the first time on 22nd June 1954 and entered USN service with Attack Squadron VA-72 at Quonset Point Naval Air Station in August 1956 and with the USMC the following month at Marine Corps Air Station, El Toro. Thereafter, the Skyhawk flew with in excess of fifty USN front line attack units and some fifteen units with the USMC, followed by a long career with the reserves and training squadrons, before it was retired from the USMC in June 1994 and the USN in September 1999. In addition to service with the USN and USMC, the Skyhawk served with the Argentinian Air Force and Navy, the Australian Navy, the Brazilian Navy, the Royal New Zealand Air Force, the Kuwait Air Force, the Iraqi Air Force, the Indonesian Air Force, the Israeli Air Force, the Republic of Singapore Air Force and the Malaysian Air Force. After retirement from military service Skyhawks operated under civilian registration in the US, Canada and Germany, where they are still flying, and with heritage organisations across North America. Overall, quite a record for an aircraft that never, thankfully, flew operationally in its intended role. This 144 page book is written by Ian White and is superbly illustrated by Richard J. Caruana.
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Stock code: WPT121

 

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Guideline Publications Mikoyan-Gurevich MIG-15 Warpaint 120
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Mikoyan-Gurevich MIG-15
  £16.00
Warpaint 120
Author: Nikolay Yakubovich

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Long overdue in the Warpaint range, the MiG-15 is one of the most important and influential aircraft to come out of the early years of the Cold War and was to see active service in a wide range of theatres and with a great many Soviet client states. The MiG-15 was a jet fighter aircraft developed by Mikoyan-Gurevich for the Soviet Union and was one of the first successful jet fighters to incorporate swept wings to achieve high transonic speeds. In combat over Korea, it outclassed straight-winged jet day fighters, which were largely relegated to ground-attack roles, and was quickly countered by the similar American swept-wing North American F-86 Sabre. The MiG-15 is often mentioned, along with the F-86 Sabre, as the best fighter aircraft of the Korean War. The MiG-15 is believed to have been one of the most produced jet aircraft ever, with in excess of 13,000 manufactured. Licensed foreign production may have raised the production total to almost 18,000. This latest addition to the Warpaint list by Nikolay Yakubovich has been sourced direct from Russian sources and includes a great many rare or previously unpublished photographs collated by the author, along with accurate scale drawings and colour profiles by Andrey Yurgenson.
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Stock code: WPT120

 

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Guideline Publications Grumman F9F Panther - May 19
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Grumman F9F Panther - May 19
  £15.00

Author: Kev Darling

This issue of Warpaint -119 Grumman F9F Panther is available as a Digital Edition
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When the US Navy decided to enter the jet age it was no surprise that it turned to Grumman for its first carrier borne jet fighter bomber with a recon option. The first design produced by the company was a mighty beast, more akin to a bomber than a fighter. Unfortunately American jet engine development was concentrating mainly on the turbojet, a slow process as little was really known about manufacturing such a powerplant. Back to the drawing board and Grumman designed a small straight winged single engined machine that would be powered by a centrifugal engine. However, America was going through an 'American stuff only' period therefore an overseas powerplant was put of the question, or was it? The problem would be solved by having the Rolls Royce Nene license manufactured by Pratt & Whitney as the J42. As insurance the Allison J33 was selected to power one batch of aircraft although all were converted to the J42 later. The resulting aircraft would be designated the F9F Panther and would enter squadron service at a fairly steady pace although this quickened once the United States found itself embroiled in the Korean War. The Panther proved itself to be a tough bird although there was the odd mix 'n' match that resulted in a blue tailed fly! The remaining Panthers would finally leave USN service in the early 1960s. The only overseas operator of the type was Argentina who also used them as carrier aircraft. This book is written by Kev Darling and is superbly illustrated by Richard J. Caruana.
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Stock code: WPT119

 

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Guideline Publications NAA B-45 Tornado No 118 OUT NOW
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NAA B-45 Tornado
  £15.00
No 118 OUT NOW
Author: Kev Darling

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Like most nations America likes to celebrate its first's. Strangely enough this didn't seem to apply to the first jet bomber in USAF service, the North American B-45 Tornado. Although the airframe layout bore some resemblance to WW2 aircraft this new boy on the block had many aerodynamic refinements commensurate with the newly emerging jet engines.
In common with many new designs the B-45 underwent many changes throughout its career, the greatest of which was the provision of more powerful and reliable engines. Major structural changes were applied to the principle bomber version to allow carriage of a nuclear weapon whilst the final model was a versatile reconnaissance aircraft, the RB-45C.
During the Korean War the RB-45C carried out valuable reconnaissance flights in support of operations whilst in Europe the B-45C remained on alert for a possible war. Under the aegis of USAF the Royal Air Force flew a handful of aircraft to plot bomber approach tracks for both Bomber Command and USAF over the Soviet Bloc.
When finally withdrawn from service the majority of B-45's were scrapped thus the surviving handful are drawn from those used as test beds. This book is written by Kev Darling and is superbly illustrated by Richard J. Caruana.
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Stock code: WPT118

 

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Guideline Publications Douglas F4D/F-6 Skyray & F5D Skylancer
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Douglas F4D/F-6 Skyray & F5D Skylancer
  £14.00

Author: Tony Buttler
The Douglas F4D Skyray (always known as the 'Ford' because of its designation) was intended to be the US Navy's first supersonic fighter, though in fact it was really a transonic aircraft.
A very handsome machine it had a relatively short career but equipped quite a number of units both with the Navy and the US Marines. It was flawed and fell short of being a true all-weather fighter, but it had excellent manoeuvrability and an impressive rate of climb and it provided many pilots with their first experience of jet aircraft.
The altogether sleeker F5D Skylancer was a true supersonic successor and provided a considerable advance over the Skyray, but it fell victim to cost cutting and only a few examples were completed, some of which were used for research.

This book is written by Tony Buttler and is superbly illustrated by Richard J.Caruana.
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Stock code: WPT117

 

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Guideline Publications Warpaint Special No 4 Cessna Bird Dog OUT NOW
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Warpaint Special No 4 Cessna Bird Dog
  £11.99
OUT NOW
Author: Des Brennan
Cessna's Bird Dog was designed and built to serve in what some might regard as the unglamorous field of Army co-operation at a time when attention was more often focused on a growing array of gleaming silver, nuclear-capable jet fighters and bombers deemed essential for a seemingly inevitable Third World War. Nonetheless the Bird Dog was flown sometimes by multiple services and by a wide range of nations on every continent.
The Bird Dog served in numerous internal and cross-border conflicts and was from the 1950s into the 1980s, and with the UH-1 Huey helicopter epitomised the role of the United States air power in operations over South-East Asia during the 1960s and into the 1970s.
This superb 68-page book is written by Des Brennan with superb colour profiles by Mark Roolfe.
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Stock code: WPS no 4

 

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Guideline Publications no 116 Hawker Fury and Nimrod
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no 116 Hawker Fury and Nimrod
  £16.00

Author: William Harrison
The first RAF front line fighter to achieve more than 200 mph was the Hawker Fury, and its naval counterpart the Hawker Nimrod. These two attractive fighters came from the design office of the late Sydney Camm, Hawker's chief designer. The Fury started life as a private venture known as the Hornet but when this machine exceeded expectations the name was changed to Fury.
Although only ordered in small numbers owing to financial constraints during the Great Depression production eventually exceeded 260 machines with orders from the RAF, Royal Navy, Persia (now Iran), Portugal, Spain, Yugoslavia and more than 30 supplied (ex-RAF) to the South African Air Force. The Fury entered service with No.43 Squadron who accepted 16 during May 1930 and stayed in front line service until January 1939 when it was replaced by the Gloster Gladiator, although quite a few remained in the training role until mid-1941.

The Furies were used in combat during WWII by Yugoslavia where they were quickly despatched by the more modern fighters of the Luftwaffe. South Africa used Furies in the East African war until 1941 and the three supplied to Spain were in action, one of them serving on both sides! The Nimrod, while bearing a distinct resemblance to the Fury, flew early in 1930. Changes for the RN included longer exhaust pipes extending down both sides of the fuselage as far as the pilot's cockpit; an oil cooler fitted beneath the engine bay and at a later date arrester gear was fitted for carrier use. Later series Nimrods featured a larger tail surface to improve inverted spinning characteristics when fitted with floats.
Deliveries of Nimrods started in September 1933 and they remained in use until May 1939.
Only a small number of Nimrods found their way abroad, two went to Denmark to act as pattern aircraft for licensed production, one was shipped to Japan and one to Portugal. Although one Fury managed to survive in the scrapyard of a London dealer it fell to John Isaacs, a draughtsman from Vickers Armstrong, to design and build both a 1/7th scale Fury and Spitfire, both of which continue to be built by members of the Light Aircraft Association, née the Popular Flying Association. This book is written by William Harrison and is superbly illustrated by Richard J.Caruana.
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Stock code: WPT116

 

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Guideline Publications no 115 Albermarle Armstorng Whitworth
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no 115 Albermarle
  £13.00
Armstorng Whitworth
Vy Tony Buttler
The Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle is something of an 'odd man out' in the list of British World War Two military aircraft. It was manufactured entirely in a special factory as sub-contract work, to save light alloys it was intended to make use of steel tube and wood in its construction, and its service career was undistinguished. As a result the Albemarle is a rather forgotten aircraft and yet it made an important contribution during the latter part of the conflict. This new Warpaint will hopefully make enthusiasts more aware of the background and career of this unusual aeroplane. This book is written by Tony Buttler and is superbly illustrated by Mark Rolfe.
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Stock code: WPT115

 

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UK: 1.27
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